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Educated By Design Blog

Filtering by Tag: design

Take Famous Figure Bios from Boring To Epic Using Adobe Spark Post!

Michael Cohen

Visual Communication skills. Everyone needs them. This isn’t an option for our K-8 students today. Their tomorrow will expect them to have an eye for design just like our yesterday expected us to know Microsoft Office. While short on time is an understatement, we need to find ways to get these skills inculcated into our students one way or another…

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Using Adobe Spark Page To Create A Dynamic Syllabus Or Lesson Plan

Michael Cohen

I sat there looking at my Syllabus. Google Docs will black text and bullet points on a white background. The outcome seemed standard. Is that what I wanted for my students? I want my student to get excited about learning new things. I want them to be curious, inspired, and energized in my class…

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Using The "Bad Idea Factory" To Help Build Creative Courage

Michael Cohen

Years ago I heard about the "Bad Idea Factory" like any buzzword I try to plumb the depths of Google to find the creator of these actives. The best I could do is find a 2012 article by Kevin Brookhouser tilted, 20% Project: Bad Idea Factory. In the article he shares that he learned about this activity from Ewen McIntosh at NoTosh but the link to his article is broken. I reached out to him on Twitter to get more information so hopefully he will respond and I can embed the tweet…

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Creativity Is About Combining The Unexpected, Not Just Drawing It

Michael Cohen

I share during many talks that creativity is a mindset not an art set. The elephant in the room is once you buy into the mantra, what steps can you take to act on the mindset? There are so many cool ways to build up our creative abilities. What I am striving to do with all my work on the Educated By Design project…

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I Preordered the iPad Pro and I am Scared

TheTechRabbi

I love the iPad. I find it to be one of the most amazing computing devices of the past two decades. It's tactile and model experiences are untouched by any of its competition, and while some will gripe at its premium price, I will smile and say its worth it. I have iPad 2's at my school that are albeit a bit sluggishly running iMovie on iOS 9 yet I would be surprised to hear of a netbook, chromebook, or even a laptop holding up that long (4 years) in an educational environment.

Still, we must be clear that the iPad is NOT a computer replacement for everyone.

Apple boldly said in their March Keynote that the iPad pro is in fact a computer replacement, it is missing a serious demographic, and that is creative professionals. If you are a business person or someone that needs simple programs and multitasking, then the iPad Pro models might work for you. I on the other hand have spent the past decade and a half using Adobe creative products and the iPad app alternatives are simply not there. While I find myself more and more working on hand drawn sketch style projects, there are certain things on the iPad that at least it this point I cant imagine doing even if it is possible.

JIFA_finalmark

Take this logo for example. Its done by slicing, layering, and rotating watercolor swatches which are then masked behind the the three unique shapes to create a single unified mark. Can this be done on the iPad Pro? Unsure and uncomfortable are two words that come to mind.

In the realm of sketching work, my go-to app has been Paper by 53 with the Pencil by 53. With my expensive yet amazing Apple Pencil, I just lost the power of the Apple Pencil and my favorite app.

Still, I am excited for the possibilities. The iPad Pro packs a powerful mix of software and hardware and I believe that the 9.7 model will attract developers including Adobe to push the limits of design.

With all this said, for the first time ever, I preordered the iPad Pro 9.7 with the keyboard case, Apple Pencil, and USB adapter. I am excited but also a bit scared. Not just because it costs as much as a macbook pro, but because I don't want to find myself on my Macbook pro because the iPad Pro can't perform.

 

Think Different, More Than Just a Choice of Device

TheTechRabbi

apple-thinkdifferent-300x225.jpg

It was 1997 and Apple challenged the world to "Think Different"This cliché is more than meets the eye, speaking more about the decision not go with the status quo device than a challenge for us as innovators and users of technology to use their devices to, think different. This is because 1997 was the same year that Apple almost went bankrupt. Twenty years later, we see Apple is a leading technology company, one who continues to push the limits of how technology can shape our future. When analyzing technology's impact on experiences in and out of education, we need to appreciate that technology affords us the ability to think different. It allows us to enhance experiences, alter others, and cause daily experiences to become obsolete. It is in this spirit that models such as SAMR as so dangerous, yet simultaneously so magical in how they enable us to measure our thoughtful use of technology.

When we look at technology only as a computer then we in fact significantly limit our potential outcomes.

file000381054567 One of the greatest technological breakthroughs of the industrial age was the invention of the typewriter. It was a device of empowerment, individuality, and of freedom. We were now able to rapidly produce our thoughts onto paper breaking the shackles of the limitations of pen and ink, and the printing press.

So what did the computer accomplish? Looks like a typewriter to me. For one, it turned production into mass production giving us the ability to store hundreds and even thousands of those typed letters on this "little" innovation. Floppy_disk_2009_G1Computing technology has come a long way, becoming smaller and simpler, with expanded abilities , and more intricate and complex results. As the decades passed this trend continued until

April 3, 2010. That was the day that Apple again, Thought Different.

That day, we went mobile, and dozens of limitations and challenges evaporated into thin air. A truly different device was created. It is not a device that can replace a computer and, therefore, isn't comparable to one. It is like trying to compare a car and a helicopter simply based on their similar ability in respect to travel. The iPad also created a challenge that other tech companies eagerly accepted. How can we take the best features of all creative devices and combine them into one. The mobile tablet was born. IMG_0140   Still, the world looked at the iPad as a consumption device, and Education looked at it was skepticism. Fast forward five years and it is abundantly clear that the iPad is much more, a creative, personalized, empowering, truly mobile device. Still as recently as yesterday I am reading criticisms leveled at the iPad that I thought we had overcome. CK5Pe4hVEAE4_z5 No one will question the importance of easy and advanced levels of writing, but once your Bluetooth keyboard pairs with the iPad, it will give you ample time to question the level of emphasis on essay writing as a means of assessment, which alienates at least four ways students can demonstrate their understanding.

Still, the iPad isn't perfect, for example, it's an IT nightmare. The iPad is extremely difficult for IT Departments to manage and support. This is, unfortunately true, and very frustrating. Apple has made little to no effort to answer the call by educational technology personnel to change how the iPad is set up and managed. Fall 2015 is a little to late and many have given up on the device as an educational tool because of this. For those that have stuck it out I ask the following question.

What drives the choice of technology at your school? The meaningful learning outcomes that students can produce or the ability for the adults to manage it?

I want what's best for my students. I want to afford them the most flexible and versatile learning tools just like I expect those same descriptors to reflect their learning spaces, and the learning itself.

I don't want my students to have an iPad, I want them to have a mobile studio that can plan, design, produce, edit, and publish most excellent learning experiences.